Home » Abortion Under State Constitutions: A State-By-State Analysis by Paul Benjamin Linton
Abortion Under State Constitutions: A State-By-State Analysis Paul Benjamin Linton

Abortion Under State Constitutions: A State-By-State Analysis

Paul Benjamin Linton

Published 2012
ISBN : 9781611630695
Hardcover
730 pages
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 About the Book 

Whether a state constitution protects a right to abortion is significant for two reasons: First, it may determine whether the State has the authority to enact and enforce laws regulating abortion (e.g., laws mandating informed consent or requiringMoreWhether a state constitution protects a right to abortion is significant for two reasons: First, it may determine whether the State has the authority to enact and enforce laws regulating abortion (e.g., laws mandating informed consent or requiring parental notice or consent) within current federal constitutional limits. Second, and more important, it will determine whether the State would have the authority to enact and enforce laws prohibiting abortion, if the Supreme Court overrules Roe v. Wade and returns the issue of abortion to the States.Abortion under State Constitutions is the first, full-length treatment of the subject to appear in print. For each State, the author considers possible sources of a right to abortion in the state constitution (privacy, due process of law, equality of rights, equal protection, privileges and immunities, as well as other provisions)- state court decisions interpreting those provisions- the relevant state constitutional history- pre-Roe prohibitions of abortion and their interpretation by state courts- post-Roe regulations of abortion- and what rights state law has conferred upon unborn children outside the context of abortion.Based upon the foregoing analysis, arranged topically within each State for ease of reference, the author concludes that thirteen state constitutions protect (or would be interpreted to protect) a state right to abortion that is independent of the right to abortion recognized in Roe v. Wade, while the supreme courts of the other thirty-seven States probably would not recognize a state right to abortion. Likely to become a standard reference work on the subject, Abortion under State Constitutions should be of interest not only to lawyers who litigate state abortion rights claims and judges who decide those cases, but to anyone on either side of the abortion debate who wants to have a better understanding of the status of abortion under state constitutions.