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The Mistakes of a Life Catherine Anne Austen Hubback

The Mistakes of a Life

Catherine Anne Austen Hubback

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230212937
Paperback
52 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1863 edition. Excerpt: ... parity of age, andMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1863 edition. Excerpt: ... parity of age, and considered Stuart had done very wisely. My mother felt it differently. She was much affected, even to tears. Poor Stuart, poor boy- I wish I could have helped this! Then after a moments pause, she added, I had hoped, Henrietta, you would have saved him from the necessity of this! I, mama, how in the world? You will be so rich in two years time, my dear I I was thunderstruck. I had never thought of the possibility- and really for Stuart I would have done a great deal. I could only answer hurriedly, as an excuse: Yes, but that does not help now, and Stuart wants immediate assistance. I have nothing yet. My mother said no more, but I could see that Stuarts marriage was a bitter thought--a sharp thorn always rankling in her mind. I did not know then how a mother loves her child- her first-born son, and feels his welfare her very life and existence, It was a very sudden change which a short time effected in our circle- by the end of a week after that dusky walk in the flowergarden on that November evening, my mother and Grace were in London. Emily Dering had left the village for an. indefinite time- the whole family of Suffields too were preparing to move, the ladies were going to Bath. Mr. Suffield wanted to go to his estate in Dorsetshire- and as Stuart was absent also, our domestic party was likely to be very small, and had not much prospect of being enlivened by visitors as it used to be. St. John did not indeed intend to remain very long in Dorsetshire, that was some comfort- but even were he to return to the Grange, we could not have the same unrestricted and constant intercourse, there would be no reason for the morning visits, and no excuse for my going to the Grange- in short I must, I felt, put things...